Interactive PDF version of 100th Entry Glossary
This Glossary explains certain terms and abbreviations which are found on the 100th Entry site, are related to RAF apprentices (and the RAF) or are not in common use.

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TERM

EXPLANATION

1250

RAF identity pass, taken from the form number. 1250 must always be carried by service personnel. Loss of 1250 is a 'capital' offence.

1771

Subsistance Claim form

23:59 to 00:01

Midnight.

252

Form used to record a charge against an offending airman. Taken from the form number.

36

Short for 36 hour leave pass, normally over a weekend. (Service personnel are officially on duty 24 hours a day and 365 days a year).(See: 48).

48

Short for 48 hour leave pass, normally over a weekend. (service personnel are officially on duty 24 hours a day and 365 days a year).(See: 36).

A/C

AirCraft;

AirCraftsman. (See: rank, erk, A/C plonk);

Alternating Current.

A/C plonk

AirCraftsman. (See: erk).

AA

Aircraft Apprentice;

Anti-Aircraft.

ace

Good.

ADGE

Air Defence Ground Environment.

admin

Administrator;

Office for administrators.

AE

Air Engineer.

AEOp

Air Electronics Operator.

AEO

Air Electronics Officer

aero

Aeronautical.

AEW

Airborne Early Warning.

AFB

Air Force Base (USA).

AFCENT

Allied Forces Central Europe(NATO).

AFPG

Armed Forces Pension Group; AFPG link

Air Force Planning Guidance.??

AI

Airborne Interceptor radar. Fitted to the nose of fighter aircraft to enable targets to be tracked and destroyed using air-to-air missiles. AI17 was fitted to the Javelin and was taught at 4T block at RAF Locking. Aircraft radar link

AIHHP

Association of Independent Hearing Healthcare Professionals.

Air Form 700

Aircraft maintenance log, referred to as 'the 700'. Always a time for concentration when signing off maintenance tasks. Interned for investigation if the aircraft is involved in an incident, especially crash.

Air Officer Commanding

Senior officer in charge of a group of stations. (See AOC).

Air Traffic Control

Air Traffic Control personnel located in control tower responsible for controlling all aircraft. Air Traffic Control have overriding authority on a station when flying is in operation. Headed by SATCO. (See: ATC).

Air Training Corps

RAF organisation for training young civilians. (See: ATC). Air Cadets link

Aircraft Apprentice

The aircraft apprenticeship trained young men, between the ages of 15 and 17, to become highly-skilled wireless and radar fitters who would service the RAF's sophisticated electronic equipment. Entrance to the scheme involved passing a general examination, intelligence test, aptitude test, and a medical examination. The Royal Air Force assumed legal guardianship of the apprentices 'in locum parentis'. The three year course covered theoretical, practical, and military training. A few Apprentices came from Commonwealth and other countries. LEARNING

Aircraft crypto

A typewriter known as KL7, similar to the German war time Enigma, which operated on 28 volts and had 5 code drums. Shackletons carried them, as did most aircfaft in the 60's.

Aircraft Servicing Flight

A unit on an RAF station, independent of a squadron, which services aircraft (eg: squadron, visitors, target-towing, chase aircraft). (See: ASF).

ALCM

Air Launch Cruise Missile. ALCM link

ale

Strictly speaking, beer with no hops, but generally understood to mean beer too. The 'CamRA' is a misnomer.

ALFENS

Automatic Low Flying Enquiry and Notification System;

Automated Low Flying and Flight Planning Enquiry & Notification System.

AN/CPN-4

See CPN4.

Andrew

Royal Navy.

AN/MPN-11

See CPN4.

anorak

Person with few social graces, dedicated to a particular subject. (eg: train spotting);

Outdoor jacket.

Anson

RAF (1948 to 1968), UK (Avro) twin piston engine (Cheetah V) transport aircraft. 11,022 Ansons (Mk I & II) were manufactured, more than any other UK aircraft. There was an Anson Mk II at Weston Airport which was used for apprentice Air Experience flights. Anson link

AOC

Air Officer Commanding.

AOC Inspection

Air Officer Commanding Inspection is a major inspection of each station, normally once a year. A time of much bull on a station.

AP

Air Publications are technical bibles for air vehicle and equipment theory, operation and servicing. (See: AP3302).

AP3302

RAF bible of radio theory. Well written, well structured.

ape shit

Angry. (eg: "he went ape shit").

app

Short for aircraft apprentice.

AR15

Plessey Mobile Surveillance radar (airfield).

ARI

Air Radio Installation;

Aircraft Radio Installation.

armourer

One of the technician trades. Responsible for all explosive devices on aircraft: guns, missiles, ejector seat etc. The armourer enables the weapons before take off and makes the aircraft safe on landing and before servicing.

arse

Posterior;

Exclamation (eg: "Arse!");

Fool (eg: "what an arse he is");

Rubbish (eg: "he is talking arse").

ASAP

As Soon As Possible.

ASF

Aircraft Servicing Flight.

Astra

RAF station cinemas are always called Astras. They are quite unlike any civilian cinema.

ASV

Air to Surface Vessel. Radar on board maritime patrol aircraft. Displays a map of the surface and detects ships and submarine snorkels. ASV17 on Varsity at Weston Airport. ASV21 was taught at 4T block at RAF Locking.

ATC

Air Traffic Control;

Air Training Corps.

ATC cadet

Young civilian member of Air Training Corps.

Atlantic Hotel

The venue for apprentice dances. On Weston sea front and still there.

Aussie

Abbreviation for Australian.

Austin 10

Pre WWII 1000 cubic centimetre family saloon with side valve engine. Separate body and chassis. Wire spoke wheels.

Austin 8

800 cubic centimetre smaller brother of the Austin 10.

Austin A30

Small family saloon. Cheap and economical.

Austin A35

Development of the Austin A30.

avionics

Contraction of aviation and electronics. Avionics covers all electronic and electrical systems on an aircraft.

Avo 8

Standard RAF multimeter of the 1960s. Named after the manufacturer. AVO Multimeters link

Avonmouth

Estuary of river Avon leading to the Bristol Channel;

Large dock and industrial area, north west of Bristol. Avonmouth Dock link

AWACS

Airborne Warning and Control System.

AWACS link

AWG

Ferranti-built gun control radar system. Fitted to the Phantom aircraft.

AWOL

Absent WithOut Leave (permission).

BAC

British Aircraft Corporation. Now BAE Systems.

BAe

British Aerospace. Now BAE Systems.

Bamboo, The

Weston lads' coffee bar on the Centre in Weston. No longer there.

bandwidth

A range of frequencies.

bang

Intercourse.

bang on

Perfect.

bang out

To eject from an aircraft. (See: bang seat).

bang seat

Aircraft ejector seat. (See: bang out).

banged up

Ill;

In prison;

Pregnant.

banger

Sausage;

Dilapidated car.

bangers and mash

Sausages and mashed potatoes.

banging on

Labouring a point.

Banwell

Village one mile south of Locking Camp on A371.

Banwell link

barber

Camp barber. A person who removes hair. Not to be confused with 'hairdresser';

The room where hair removal takes place.

base

(See: station; camp).

bash

To curve the top of SD cap;

Group heavy drinking session;

Dance;

Social occasion.

Basher

Nickname, normally for strong person;

Nickname for person with First name William (Bill);

Small building with wooden framework covered in palm leaves (hot countries);

Person who attempts to impose a concept. (eg: Bible basher).

basic light bulbs

Lessons in 2 technical block covering basic electrical theory, with practical exercises.

Bath

City 28 miles (45km) north east of Weston.

battle dress

Working uniform with waist-length jacket made from thick hairy material. Darker blue colour than best blue. (See: working blue; number two). Example

bayonet

The RAF used either a knife blade or round pointed (pig sticker) bayonet. The bayonet was carried in a frog on a webbing belt or fitted to the end of a rifle (fixed bayonets). Bayonets were very tightly controlled by the authorities and apprentices were only issued with the blade bayonet for special parades. They never used the pig sticker bayonet.(See: frog, rifle).

BBMF

Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.

bbmf

Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.

BD

Battle dress. (See: working blue; number two). Example

Beach Coffee Club

Members only club on Weston sea front. The 100th Entry club. Soft drinks, tea, coffee and snacks served. Small dance floor in cellar with juke box, pinball machines, and one armed bandits. Excellent place for meeting young ladies. Always referred to as 'The Beach' by the 100th Entry. Link1 Link2

bean counter

Accountant;

Logician;

Estimator.

Bean stealer

Married airman 'living in' for free.

beat up

Where a pilot flies low over an area, normally the runway, at high speed. Particularly impressive when performed by a Lightning or Vulcan.

Beatles, The

UK singer-songwriter pop group from Liverpool. The Beatles caused a world-wide sensation in the 1960's. The group line-up was: John Lennon (deceased) (rhythm and lead electric guitar), Paul McCartney (electric bass guitar), George Harrison (deceased) (lead electric guitar), Ringo Starr (drums). Every group member could sing, but the lead singers were Paul and John. The group even appeared at the Odeon cinema at Weston. The Beatles were extremely popular with the 100th Entry (See: the fab four, Parlophone, Rolling Stones).

Beatle Jacket

Medium length, high button jacket with no collar. First worn by the Beatles. Often made of black corduroy. A few of the 100th Entry had one. Highly illegal.

Beatle Wig

Male wig in the Beatles style. Normally a complete rip off with poor quality and high price. Two were known in the 100th Entry. Contraband.

bed pack

Apprentices stripped their beds every morning, except Sunday, and made a bed pack which was placed at the top of the bed. The bed pack comprised four blankets and two sheets. Three blankets were each folded into a square and the two folded sheets placed between them like a sandwich. The fourth blanket was wrapped around the, blankets and sheets. The bed pack had to be square and neat to pass inspection. Bed Pack photo

Bed pan mechanic

Medic.

bee's knees

The best.

beer

Alcoholic drink (1% to 6% by volume) that has hops. In the UK there are three broad categories of beer: barrel (real ale), keg (metal, pressurised barrel), lager.

Beetle

Volkswagen small family saloon. Air-cooled horizontally opposed engine. Well built and dead reliable.

beetle crusher

Large shoes (See: teddy boy, brothel creeper).

belly flop

Aircraft landing with wheels up;

Aircraft very hard landing;

To dive and hit water with front of body (painful).

bender

Drink to excess, normally over a long period.

bent

Corrupt;

Homosexual.

beret

Working RAF headgear made of felt. Replaced the much-loved forage cap in 1950s (reintroduced in 1970s). No two berets were the same due to extensive shaping and modification. Examples

best blue

RAF uniform with long belted jacket. Made of barathea. Worn on formal occasions. (See: number one; blue). Best Blue link

BFO

Beat Frequency Oscillator.

Biggles

Naive person deeply interested in aircraft and the RAF;

Pilot of transport aircraft (rare). Alludes to the hero in Biggles books.

bike

Motorbike. Strictly forbidden for apprentices although some apprentices had them hidden around the Weston area;

Pedal bicycle;

Promiscuous female ('station bike').

Billet

Large room, part of a block, where each apprentice had a pit. The pits were in two rows each side of a central walkway. After the first six months the 100th Entry moved from wooden huts to the brand-new, brick-built, E block and F Block.

bimbo

Not too bright young lady, often blonde.

bind

Uninteresting, boring or difficult. (eg: “ironing this shirt is a right bind”)

bint

Attractive young lady or ladies.

biog

Biography (abbreviation used on the 100th web site).

bird

Attractive young lady;

Aircraft.

bird strike

Damage caused to aircraft by impact with birds (flying type). Bird Strike link

birk

Fool.

bit of stuff

Attractive young lady.

bitter

Light coloured beer.

black box

Aircraft flight recorder;

Unit of equipment.

Blanco

Thick, greasy paste applied to webbing. Grey-blue Blanco and white Blanco used by the RAF.

Bleadon Hill

Area in the south of Weston. Posh young ladies bred here.

blighty

United Kingdom.

blimey

Exclamation like "wow!".

block

Building, normally large.

Block,1T

 

Hangar divided into rooms. (Subjects taught: ground equipments).

Block,2T

 

Hangar divided into rooms. (Subjects taught: basic electrical practical, basic radio practical, ground equipments).

Block,3T

 

Hangar with two stories divided into classrooms. (Subjects taught: electronic theory, maths, general studies).

Block,4T

Hangar divided into classrooms and workshops. (Subjects taught: air equipments, metalwork, wiring, waveguide theory).

Block,5T

Low rise brick building to the north of F Block), behind the parade square. (Subjects taught: computer techniques, cryptology). 5T block was completed in 1964 and was not used by the 100th Entry. 5T block foundations were the site of 'the crane mystery'

Block,E

100th Entry billet facing the sports field. To the west of F block.

Block,F

100th Entry billet facing the sports field. To the east of E Block.

bloke

Man.

blood

Dry, rough farmhouse cider mixed with blackcurrant juice. (See: screech, sweet).

blow a gasket

Lose temper.

blue

RAF uniform. (See: best blue, working blue, number one, number two, battle dress, hairy blue, SD (cap), beret, boot, webbing belt).

blue job

Airman.

Blue Silk

Navigation radar installed in V bombers. Upgraded Green Satin. V Bomber link

bod

Man. Short for 'body'.

bog standard

Basic.

bogs

Wash room.

bollocks

Nonsense;

Testicles.

bomber

Aircraft capable of dropping bombs;

Nickname for person with surname 'Harris'. After Air Vice Marshall Harris, head of bomber command in WWII. 2WWharris

bonk

Sleep;

Copulate.

bonkers

Mad;

Angry.

Bonni

Short for Triumph Bonneville.

bonse

Head.

boot

Apprentices were issued with a pair of boots and a pair of shoes. The boots were of old design and extremely uncomfortable when new but, after about two months of wear, became acceptable. Apprentices always wore boots while on duty and only wore shoes with best blue when off-camp. The toes and heel-back of boots were polished (bulled) to a high gloss by spit and polish. Generally, in the RAF, boots would only be worn on parade. Specialist boots were issued for: combat, flying, servicing aircraft and fire fighting. WRAFs were discouraged from bulling their footwear because of the mirror-like finish. Bulled Boot

Boots

Nickname for person with surname Brown.

booze

Alcoholic drink.

booze up

Group heavy drinking.

boozer

Pub.

bounced

Rejected.

Bourneville

Large estate in southern Weston. Many house parties at the Bourneville.

Borough Arms

Pub at the junction of Locking Road (A370) and Locking Moor Road (A371). Near to Weston Milton Halt railway station. Large imposing old building with public bar, lounge, and skittle alley. Folk club and live music. For a time it was renamed 'The Heron' but The Borough Arms is more appropriate. Rarely visited by the 100th Entry.

box

Television set. (See: idiot box, tube).

boy

Short for boy entrant.

brass

High ranking service person;

Prostitute.

brasses

Buttons and buckles, made of brass, which required constant polishing. (See: Brasso, Duragilt)

Brasso

Propriety liquid polish. Used on brasses.

brat

Apprentice;

Boy entrant.

Brean Down

Promontory to the north of the river Axe with derelict fort on the end. Site for 100th Entry exercises.

Bren

'Brno' light machine gun (Bren Gun link). Deadly accurate. Apprentices fired Brens at Locking camp rifle range.

brewers droop

Unable to perform due to the effects of alcohol.

Brinkley stick

Conductive rod with insulated handle to discharge high voltages, normally from capacitors. Once dangerous voltages had been discharged the equipment was safe to work on.(See: de bollocking rod).

Bristol and Exeter

Pub, near the Odeon, on the corner opposite the Centre. Fairly small and basic. Now called the Town Crier.

Bristol

The aircraft and engine manufacturer;

The historic city 20 miles (32km) north east of Weston on the river Avon. The water at Burton on Trent is excellent for brewing beer, the water at Bristol is similarly excellent for breeding attractive ladies. (See: Ten Bars, Cellar Bars, Newmarket Bar, Rummer, Colston Hall).

bristols

Breasts. (Cockney rhyming slang ' Bristol City' with 'titty').

brit

British person.

Britannia

Pub at north end of high street in Weston. Popular with the 100th Entry. The Britannia is still there.

Brothel creeper

large shoes. (See: teddy boy).

brown

Brown ale. Not an ale in fact, but a dark brown beer.

brown job

British Army Person

brown split

50:50 split of brown ale and mild or light ale.

brown top

(See: brown split).

BSA Gold Star

Beautiful, race-bred single cylinder British motorbike. 350cc and 500cc versions. Not for slow speed riding.

BSA Road Rocket

Lusty, solid 650cc vertical twin cylinder British motorbike. Made by the Birmingham Small Arms Association (BSA).

BSA Shooting Star

500cc motorbike. Smaller brother of the BSA Road Rocket.

bucket

Transport aircraft.

buckshee

Free.

buff

Person deeply interested and knowledgeable in a particular field;

To polish. (See: boot);

Colour of official envelope or file.

bull

To polish etc;

The result of polishing etc. (See: boot).

bull night

An evening devoted to cleaning and polishing billet and equipment. Friday night was always bull night at RAF Locking, but other nights could also be deemed bull nights. The billets were inspected every morning while the apprentices were at tech. Apprentices stood by their beds for an inspection of themselves and the billet on Saturday morning.

bull shit

Bragging nonsense;

Cleaning polishing etc.

bum fluff

Adolescent facial hair.

bumf or bumph

Information, normally printed.

Derived from 'bumfodder'.

bumper

Floor polishing implement comprising a long pivoted handle with a heavy square base on the bottom, covered with a felt pad. Used for polishing floor. Bumper link

bun in the oven

Pregnant. Amusing term in 1960's but now a cliché.

Burrington Combe

Gorge 10 miles South East of RAF Locking. The Hymn 'Rock of Ages' was written in a cave at Burrington Combe. Site for rock climbers from the 100th Entry.

bus

Car;

Transport aircraft.

Butch

Nickname for person with surname Butcher;

General nickname for person.

button stick

Contraption for cleaning buttons while keeping the underlying cloth free of polish. Photo

buzz

Drinking game. (See: Fizz Fuzz Buzz);

Rumour.

C BUHF

Ground wireless equipment.

C of E

Church of England.

CA

Corporal Apprentice. (See: CAA, rank).

CAA

Corporal Aircraft Apprentice. (See: CA, rank).

Civil Aviation Authority.

CADF

Commutated-Antenna Direction Finder. Ground radar.

CAFNET

Combat Air Force Network. Ground wireless.

camp

(See: station, base);

Related to homosexuality.

CamRA

Campaign for Real Ale. Movement in UK to encourage the drinking of traditional beer. The movement's name is a misnomer.

can

Cell. (eg: "he is in the can");

Responsibility. (eg: "he is carrying the can for the accident");

Throw away (verb). (eg: "he canned the screw because it was bent").

can-do

Can (and will) complete requested action;

Positive attitude.

cancer stick

Cigarette.

Canberra

The English Electric Canberra was a jet-powered light bomber, manufactured in large numbers through the 1950s. It proved to be highly adaptable, serving in such varied roles for tactical bombing, photographic, electronics, and meteorological reconnaissance. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Electric_Canberra

The Canberra aircraft used at Weston Airport was WD936, redesignated 7589M. A B2 variant, first delivered to the RAF on 25/05/1951. It was 'Struck off charge' on 28/10/1963 and delivered for training by Locking apprentices. Sold to BAC on 18/10/66, withdrawn from use 10/11/67 and finally broken up at Samlesbury in 1968.

cans

Headphones. Very trendy term in 1960s but a cliché now.

Captain's Cabin

Pub with entrance up steps in narrow alley on sea front at Anchor Head, Weston. Small public bar and huge lounge with window giving panoramic view out to sea. The lounge also had a small stage. Often had live music with good groups. Normally packed. Quite expensive, but very popular with apprentices. Now a pleasant pub with small restaurant where the old lounge was. The steps are still a hazard when you have had a few.

Cardiff Arms

Basic public house with front entrance on Meadow Street and rear entrance on Regent Street. Run by formidable landlady and her brother Tommy who was very fond of apprentices. Popular with the 100th Entry for serious drinking.

carpet, on the

In trouble with authority. Alludes to standing on the carpet in front of superior.

CasEvac

Casualty Evacuation. To transport wounded or sick personnel to hospital, normally by aircraft from overseas.

cat

Short for category;

Bulldozer. Alludes to Caterpillar the US manufacturer of heavy earth moving machinery.

cc

Cubic centimetre.

CRDF

Cathode Ray Direction Finder.

Cellar Bars

(See: Ten Bars).

Chalky

Nickname for person with surname 'White'.

chap

Man.

charge

Formal accusation of a misdemeanour;

To replenish an electrical battery.

charge sheet

(See: 252).

Cheddar Gorge

Gorge 10 miles south east of RAF Locking. Tourist shops and pubs. Popular with the 100th Entry for social visits and mountain climbing. Also the site for exercises.

cherry

Female virginity. (eg: "she lost her cherry").

chevron

Badge of rank for NCO. (See: stripe, hook, rank).

chief, chiefy

Short for chief technician. (See: rank).

chin wag

Talk. (See: jaw wag).

chinky chippy

Yips fish and chip shop on Sanford Road, Weston.

Chip

A nickname;

Chipped potato.

Chippy

Nickname for person with surname related to wood;

Station carpenter;

Fish and chip shop.

chisel

Square toed shoe. Illegal for apprentices. (See: winkle picker).

chit

A short note;

A signed voucher authorising some action.

chitty

(See: chit).

chopper

Helicopter;

Penis;

Cleaver.

chuffed

Pleased.

cinema, Central

Known as 'The Flea Pit'. Grand old cinema at the south end of the high street, Weston. Often showed 'continental' films. Demolished in 1963. The site is now part of the Dolphin Square Shopping Centre.

cinema, Gaumont

Old cinema on the south side of Regent Street Weston. Cheaper than the Odeon and popular with apprentices. Favoured cinema for liaisons with young ladies. Became a Top Rank bingo hall and now the site of 'Yates' bar.

cinema, Odeon

Art Deco main cinema in Weston near the floral clock on Alexandria parade. Many apprentice liaisons with the opposite sex. The Odeon now has four screens, but still retains some of its modern grandeur. It is the only remaining cinema proper in Weston, but the Playhouse Theatre often shows films.

circus

Shambles.

CIS

Communications and Information Systems.

civvies

Civilian clothes;

Civilians.

civvy

Civilian.

civvy street

Outside the armed services.

clanger

Mistake (eg: “he dropped a clanger”);

Cell in guard room (eg: “he is in the clanger”).

Clevedon

Quiet small seaside town ten miles north of Weston.

clink

Cell in guard room;

Civilian prison.

CO

Commanding Officer. Each station has a CO who would normally be a senior officer. Equivalent to Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of a civilian company.

Coach House

Public house in Locking Village. Strictly out of bounds to apprentices. Occasionally visited by apprentices.

coffee swindle

(See: swindle, tea swindle).

Colston Hall

Theatre named after Bristol 1800s entrepreneur. Many famous artists appeared. Because Mr Colston was involved in the slave trade, there is now a move by do-gooders to change the name of Colston Hall.

Columbia

One of the EMI Ltd group of companies. Music and records. (See: HMV, Parlophone).

Commodore, The

Hotel, restaurant, bars, and function rooms. Located at Sand Bay, Weston, near the end of the Toll Road. In the 1960s classy and reserved. The place to take the girlfriend for a special occasion. It is owned by a large 'chain' now but has still retained some of its charm.

corp

Short for corporal.

corporal

Junior NCO with two stripes. (See: rank).

counterpane

Cover on top of bed to brighten pit space.

CPN4

CPN4 is a Ground Control Approach (GCA) road and air transportable radar. http://www.tpub.com/content/radar/TM-11-487C-1/TM-11-487C-10020.htm Designed around 1945 by the American Gillfillian Brothers, it comprises three subsystems: search radar, precision approach radar (PAR) and wireless communication sets, normally both VHF and UHF. All three subsystems are housed in the 'operations trailer' which also has three ground controller bays. In 1957 the RAF had 34 CPN4s deployed at airfields in the UK and overseas. http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1957/1957%20-%201284.html CPN4 normally operates from the station mains supply but it can also be powered from generators housed in a separate trailer. Normally the complex also has a 'crew trailer' and a 'workshop/stores trailer'. The official nomenclature for CPN4 is AN/CPN-4. The later MPN11 (AN/MPN-11) is the same except that the cabin panels are riveted and welded, rather than being bolted. This provides better weather sealing. http://www.tpub.com/content/radar/TM-11-487C-1/TM-11-487C-10372.htm The terms CPN4 and MPN11 tend to be used interchangeably in the RAF.

Photo links...

CPN4 at RAF Valley

CPN4 operators bay

CR, C/R

Control and Report. Describes all the long range ground radars.

CR787

Airfield control ground radar by Cossor.

crab

RAF person. Alludes to 'crab fat grey'.

crab fat grey

Official description of RAF uniform blue colour.

crack

Vagina;

Indeterminate for anything (eg: "it was a good crack").

(Word has no connection with 'crack cocaine').

cracked it

Sorted out a problem.

crap

Nonsense;

Rubbish;

Bad;

Excreta.

crash

Sleep after much partying. (See: crash out).

crash out

(See: crash).

crate

Dilapidated aircraft, normally transport;

Dilapidated car.

creep

Fawner.

crew

Aircrew;

Members of a team.

crypto

See Aircraft crypto

Criterion, The

Small public house on the north side of Upper Church Road, Weston. 200 yards inland from the sea front at Knightstone, nearly opposite the Raglan Arms. Popular with some of the 100th Entry as an out-of-the-way watering hole.

crumpet

Attractive young lady or ladies.

CSDE

Central Servicing Development Establishment. Used to be based at RAF Swanton Morley.

Danesbury

Coffee bar on Richmond Street in Weston. No longer there.

DCSA

Defence Communications Services Agency DCSA link

DD

Double Diamond. Name of make of bitter ale (beer). 60s and 70s Beer Guide

de bollocking rod

(See: Brinkley stick).

dear John

Letter from girl friend, normally back home, tactfully indicating that the relationship is over.

DEC

Digital Equipment Corporation.

demob

To leave RAF for civilian life.

denims

Boiler suit (light green for apps but many colours in RAF) Denims in use;

Jeans.

detachment

Temporary transfer to another station.

DFCS

Day Fighter Combat Squadron.

DI

Drill Instructor.

digs

Accommodation off camp. (See: pad). description link

ding dong

Argument;

Fuss.

discip

Short for discipline.

disk

Coloured plastic disk fitted behind beret badge to indicate squadron. (blue= 'A' squadron, green= 'B' squadron and light grey = 'C' squadron);

Record for gramophone.

ditch

To crash land an aircraft in water;

To discard.

dodgy

Suspect.

dog's bollocks

The best (See: bee's knees, ace).

doll

Very attractive young lady.

donk

Short for donkey. Refers to an aircraft engine.

Doppler effect

The change in frequency of a wave, normally electromagnetic, as perceived by an observer moving relative to the source of the wave. A number of radar equipments use this principle for navigation and bombing. The Doppler effect was an important subject in a radar apprentice's curriculum.

dork

A naive, not bright person (See: womble).

dosh

Money.

drainpipes

Trousers with very narrow legs. Highly illegal for apprentices. Clothing Rules

drongo

Moron.

duck's arse

Where hair is combed backwards to form a line at the centre of the rear of the head. Alludes to the appearance of a duck's rear. (See: teddy boy).

duff gen

Wrong or unreliable information. (See gen)

Duke of Edinburgh's Award

Scheme sponsored by the Duke of Edinburgh to develop the skills of youths between 15 and 18 by a programme of activities. Some of the 100th Entry, who volunteered for the scheme, achieved the higher awards. A badge worn on the left sleeve of the uniform indicated successful completion. D of E Award link

dumb Insolence

A chargeable offence, usually for looking at an officer or NCO the wrong way.

Duraglit

Proprietary metal polish soaked cotton wool. Used on Brasses. Much more effective than Brasso.

Dusty

Nickname for anyone with surname 'Miller';

State of many apprentices' pit space.

E&OE

Errors and Omissions Excepted.

EADS

European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company.

EASA

European Aviation Safety Agency.

ECM

Electronic Counter Measures. A subsection of electronic warfare which includes any sort of electrical or electronic device designed to fool radar, sonar, infra-red (IR), and light(Laser) systems.

EES

Electrical Engineering Squadron.

Egyptian PT

Lying on your bed rather than joining in strenuous activity. Alludes to the pose assumed by Egyptian mummies.

El Fitt

Electronics Fitter.

Electronic

Relates to the flow of electrical charge through a medium (ie: conductor, semiconductor, gas, vacuum) and device (ie: valve, transistor, diode, transformer, inductor, capacitor, resistor).

Elson

Aircraft toilet, named after manufacturer.

EMC

ElectroMagnetic Compatibility. The ability of an electrical or electronic unit to work satisfactorily in its electromagnetic environment without adversely influencing other devices, or being influenced by them.

EMI Ltd

Electrical and Musical Industries Ltd. Conglomerate UK parent company comprising a wide range of companies including, electronics and Music. (See: EMI Electronics, HMV, Parlophone, Columbia).

EMIE Ltd

EMI Electronics Ltd.

EMI Electronics Ltd

Part of the EMI Ltd group of companies. Areas included design, development and production of military electronic equipment. Later became Thorn EMI Electronics. The modification labels on many RAF equipments have 'EMIE' marked on them. ASV21 is an example.

Entry

Apprentice intake. There were three entries a year at RAF Locking. The intakes ranged from around 20 to 200.

erk

An aircraft maintenance person, usually of low rank;

Aircraftsman.

ex-

No longer.

fab

Short for fabulous. (See: fab four).

fab four, the

The Beatles. A genuine term in the 1960s, but whimsical now. (See: fab, Beatles).

fag

Cigarette;

To complete task under duress for senior Entry;

Rarely used in US sense (homosexual).

fairy

Derogatory name for radio fitter (trade group 2). (eg: “he is a fairy with a hankie up his sleeve and a Kit Kat in his top pocket”). Fairy was not a derogatory term on V Force, Where radio fitters called themselves fairies.

fandango

Shambles. (See: circus, pantomime).

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions.

father

Station commanding officer;

Station warrant officer.

FEAF

Far East Air Force.

feet under the table

To be welcome in girlfriend's parent's home. A major development in relations with the girl friend.

Fellas

Ice-cream parlour cum coffee bar on Regent's Street, Weston. No longer there; Locking Review ad

Fellas ice cream van which visited RAF Locking.

fighter

fighter aircraft;

One of the air radar trades.

file

Folder for documents, especially your 'PERSONAL FILE';

Workshop tool used to remove material from metal and paxolin;

Digital information arranged in a defined format.

fire piquet

Small group of airmen detailed to patrol an area of a camp for fire prevention and to control any fire until real firemen arrived. A tolerable duty, providing you didn't have to put out any fires.

fire up

Start an engine or machine.

fish and chip road

Saint James Street in Weston. Almost entirely full of Greek and Italian fish and chip shops, restaurants, and cafes.

fitter

Maintenance technician.

Fizz, Fuzz, Buzz

Drinking game (See: Buzz).

FKI

Full Kit Inspection.

flack

Shells put into the air by ground fire;

Criticism (eg: "he took the flack").

flannel

Not tell the truth in a long winded way;

Nonsense.

(See: bull).

flap

Movable control surface on aircraft;

Panic.

flash

Smart.

flash call

The highest priority telephone message on a flying station. A flash call overrides all other communications and goes directly to ATC at the control tower. All flying operations are immediately terminated. Flash calls are rare, normally due to debris or animals on runway... God help you if you make an erroneous flash call.

flight

Short for flight sergeant (See: rank);

Group of about six RAF aircraft;

The personnel associated with a group of RAF aircraft;

A group of personnel, not necessarily associated with aircraft. (eg: a flight of apprentices).

flight sergeant

(See: rank, flight).

FOD

Foreign Object Damage

Ford 10

Pre WWII family saloon with side valve engine. Separate body and chassis. Wire spoke wheels.

Ford 8

Small brother of the Ford 10.

Ford Anglia

1960s American style body small family saloon with overhead valve engine. Distinctive cut-away rear window. Quiet and comfortable but poor road-holding.

Ford Prefect

1930s American style body small family saloon with side valve engine. 'Sit up and beg' appearance. Reliable, but atrocious road holding.

Ford Prefect Mk2

1950s American style body small family saloon, but still with side valve engine. Smart, solid and reliable.

foreign object

Any substance, debris or article alien to an aircraft, vehicle or system which would potentially cause damage. Those who work on aircraft are paranoid about foreign bodies, as even the smallest item can cause a problem during flight. Jet engines are particularly vulnerable. The result is Foreign Object Damage (FOD).

Foresters

Pub on Alexander's Parade, Weston. Small public bar and pleasant lounge. Popular with apprentices and airmen. Still there but now called The Alexander Bar.

form

Paper used for application, questionnaire etc. Required for almost ANY apprentice activity;

Performance of a drinker (eg: “he's on form tonight!”);

Long bench to sit on in the gym.

Forte's

Weston had three ice-cream parlours owned by the Italian Forte family. The first and largest was located on Weston sea front near the Long Bar. The second was opposite Knightstone where the public baths were. The third and smallest was on the Centre, near the Town Hall. None remain. Locking Review ad

Four Rose, The

Coffee bar on Weston sea front, near to the Beach Club. popular with the 95th and 96th Entries, and others. No longer there.

foxtrot oscar

Go away (See: phonetic alphabet).

FPS6

Height finder ground radar. (See: nodding horror).

Fred

Fred Quimby. Producer of cartoon films. (See: Astra);

'Fred the wheeltapper'. 'Star' of many RAF posters and films emphasising the important of using calibrated test equipment.

Freedom of Weston Super Mare

An honour, granted by Weston Council, which permitted airmen and apprentices to march through the town with rifles and fixed bayonets. Each year the Lord Mayor invited the commanding officer (CO) of RAF Locking to hold a parade through Weston. Photos

frog

Bayonet holder, fitted to webbing belt. Photo

full Monty

The whole thing;

The fifth stage of relationship with girlfriend.

Gan

Island in the Indian Ocean, once an RAF base. One of the Gan sites

Gandhi's revenge

The effects of a strong curry on the digestive system the next day. (See: screaming ab dabs).

gash

Spare;

Unrefined.

gate guardian

Historical aircraft, typically Spitfire, mounted on plinth outside many RAF stations.

RAF Locking gate guardian

GCA

Ground Control Approach. Ground radar to guide aircraft to runway. (See: CPN4, MPN11).

GCHQ

Government Communications Headquarters (UK).

GD

Ground Defence;

General Duties.

gear

equipment;

clothes;

fashionable clothes.

gen

Short for 'general information'. But means any information. (See: duff gen, pukka gen).

gen

True;

Information.

Geordie

Nickname for person from Newcastle.

Ginge

Nickname for person with ginger hair.

Ginger

Nickname for person with ginger hair.

Glengarry Club

Night club in Weston, near Knightstone.

gob

Mouth;

To spit;

Talk a lot.

God

Marshal of the Royal Air Force. A misnomer because he is higher than God.

goggle box

Television set. (See: box, idiot box, tube).

goggle eyed

Intoxicated.

Gold fish bowl

Air Traffic local control.

Golden Eagle Day

Pay Day.

gone for a Burton

Failed. Burton probably alludes to Burton on Trent (not Burton, the low-cost tailor as is often thought), where the water is ideal for brewing beer. The logic is that once you go to Burton-on Trent and taste the beer, you don't want to return to your camp.

goon

Buffoon;

Guard (rare). Dates to term in WWII for prison of war enemy guard;

Joker;

Member of the 'Goon Show' (UK comedy radio show of 1950s).

Grand Central

'Up market' bar on Weston sea front. Always packed, even on most Mondays. Saturday, difficult to get in because it was so full. Take the new girlfriend there to impress her (but you wouldn't take her there now). Same management as 'Long Bar' and 'Toby Bar'.

Grand Pier

The second pier built in Weston. Opposite The Beach Club. The scene of many meetings with the opposite sex. (See: Old Pier).

grape vine

Rumour mill.

grease monkey

MT fitter;

Engine or airframe fitter.

greaser

Scruffy civilian youth, often with motorbike;

Grease monkey.

greatcoat

Long, double breasted coat made from thick felt. Tight fitting. Could sleep standing in it without falling over. Many brass buttons. Impervious to cold and wind. Good design. Very expensive. Greatcoats were not owned by airmen, instead remained property of the Queen. Loss caused a major kerfuffle. greatcoat

Green Satin

Airborne, radar navigation aid (See: Blue Silk).

GRIS

Ground Radio Installation Squadron (Radio Engineering Unit Royal Air Force Henlow). GRIS link

groovy

Fashionable;

Smart;

Modern.

(See: trendy).

grounded

Aircraft deemed not fit to fly. The highest category of aircraft unseviceability is 'AOG' (Aircraft On Ground), but for the V bomber force it was 'VOG';

To be confined to the camp.

GRSF

Ground Radio/Radar Servicing Flight.

grub

Food.

guardroom

Building near the entrance of an RAF camp. Used by those on Guard Duty and jankers.

H1131

Ground wireless equipment.

hair cut, service

The complete removal of all hair from shirt collar to beret or SD hat, whichever is higher. Hair above headgear line may or may not be cut. (See: short back and sides, barber).

hairy Mary

Uniform of similar style to a Number 1, but in the same material as the battle dress. (See: hairy blue).

hairy blue

Obsolete best blue given to apprentices, in place of battle dress, as working blue to use up vast stocks. Long jacket, of similar pattern to best blue, with belt and brass buttons. Trousers kept armpits warm. (See: uniform, hairy Mary).

half

Half pint of beer (See: pint).

half inch

To 'steal'. Cockney rhyming slang, rhymes with pinch.

hard tack

Survival rations, mainly dry biscuits.

hard titty

Hard luck (sarcastic).

Hartly 13A

Quirky, standard RAF oscilloscope. Named after manufacturer.

hash

A mess. (eg: "he made a right hash of ironing his blue").

hatch

Have a baby;

Opening with a cover.

HD51

MCVF equipment (ground wireless).

Head Quarters

TBD (See: HQ).

heave-ho

Throw out (eg: "his girlfriend gave him the big heave-ho").

Hedgehoppers Anonymous

1960s pop group, formed by RAF fitters.

Hedgehoppers Anonymous”

heels, Cuban

High tapered heels, normally on boots. Popular with youths in 1960s.

Heels, stiletto

Very high, thin heels. Popular with ladies in the 1950s and 1960s. Allowed ladies to reach boyfriend wearing Cuban Heels.

helmet

Top of penis. Usually kept out of site except for medical inspections and special occasions;

Leather headgear for Air Experience flights.

HF

High Frequency.

Hi Fi

High Fidelity audio equipment. The 1960s version of the iPod.

his nibbs

Person in high authority.

HL13

MCVF equipment (ground wireless).

HL14

MCVF equipment (ground wireless).

HMRC

Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs. Was Inland Revenue.

HMS

Her Majesty's (Queen's) Ship. Land-based naval stations were also categorised as Her Majesty's Ships;

Her Majesty's (Queen's) Service. (eg: “the agent was on Her Majesty's Service”).

HMV

His Master's Voice. One of the EMI Ltd group of companies. Music and records. They had a large record factory at Hayes, Middlesex, where many of the Beatles records were pressed.(See: Parlophone, Columbia).

HNC

Higher National Certificate (eg: electrical engineering, electronic engineering, electrical and electronic engineering).

honk

Be sick. (See: spew).

hook

Chevron on arm or shoulder of uniform to indicate apprentice rank.

Hospital, Weston General

1930s stone built hospital to the west of Weston Public Library on the Boulevard. Now converted into upmarket sheltered accommodation. A large modern hospital at Uphill replaces it. Apprentices were patients at Weston General Hospital, especially following road traffic accidents.

hot water, in

In trouble.

housemaid

Small soft bag containing needles, thread etc. Part of apprentice kit.

HQ

Head Quarters.

HR24

Ground wireless HF Receiver.

HR28

Ground wireless HF Receiver.

HS31

Ground wireless High Power HF Transmitter.

HS71

Ground wireless HF Transmitter.

hump-back bridges

Two narrow hump-back road bridges just outside Weston. The scene of numerous motoring accidents. The west bridge, near the Borough Arms, spans the loop line and the east bridge spans the main railway line. The old road over the west bridge is now a one way route out of Weston. The east bridge has been replaced by the massive Flowerdown Bridge which spans the main line, a foot path, and a cycleway. It supports a dual carriageway from junction 21 of the M5. The east bridge now only carries a foot-path and cycleway.

Hunter

RAF (1954 to 1963), UK (Hawker) single jet engine (Avon 27) fighter aircraft. 100th Entry apprentices trained on a Hunter at Weston Airport Hangar North. Museum_Hunter_2007

The Hunter aircraft used at Weston Airport was WT555, redesignated 7499M. An F1 variant, first flown on 16/05/1953. These days it is sometimes mounted on the roof of Vanguard Haulage (now pickfords), Greater London http://www.thunder-and-lightnings.co.uk/hunter/survivor.php?id=16 .

Hutton

Small village, 4 miles (6.4km) from RAF Locking on the 'back road' past Bristol Aerojet (no longer there) to Weston. Hutton now has many more houses but has retained its charm.

IAL

International Aeradio Limited. An Aviation Communications Company. Now Serco.

IBM

International Business Machines.

ICL

International Computers Limited. Now Fujitsu.

idiot box

Television set. (See: box, tube).

IFF

Identification Friend or Foe. Airborne radar equipment which returns its identity on interrogation from other aircraft or the ground.

ILS

Instrument Landing System. Air and ground.

Imperial, The

Pub in Weston, near to the Royal Hotel. In the 1960s it had a fairly pretentious lounge which was occasionally visited by the 100th Entry. Jack's Bar was at the back. The Imperial is still there, but it is now a young peoples pub, with live music or disco and a small dance floor. Friendly atmosphere.

in the know

To know what is going on.

initiative

Military operation.

inspection

Detailed review. (See: AOC, bed pack).

IoW

Isle of White.

iron

Smoothing Iron. Used with a damp cloth and brown paper to produce razor-sharp creases in uniform. Requires great skill to avoid double creases, creases in the wrong place, and scorch marks.

irons

Cutlery.

IUKADGE

Improved United Kingdom Air Defence Ground Environment.

J/T

Junior Technician. (See: rank).

jabs

Injections.

Jack's Bar

Small, friendly bar at the rear of The Imperial with separate entrance on West Street. A cider drinkers haven. Clients comprised, serious cider drinkers, 'posh' cider drinkers, and the 100th Entry. Fizz, Fuzz, Buzz played there, especially on Wednesday nights when funds were low. A pint of cider cost 9d (4p). The door is still there but Jack's Bar is no longer.

Jaguar E Type

Superlative two seater sports car with a long nose. Big, beautiful, and powerful. A British icon. Way beyond the reach of apprentices. (See: Jaguar XK120, Jaguar XK150, Jaguar Mark II).

Jaguar Mark II

Classy saloon car. Fast, quiet comfortable with excellent road holding. Still looks good today. Too expensive for apprentices. (See: Jaguar XK120, Jaguar XK150).

Jaguar XK120

Two seater British sports car. Charismatic and fast. The forerunner of the E Type Jag. (See: Jaguar XK150, Jaguar Mark II).

Jaguar XK150

Two seater sports car. Updated version of the Jaguar XK120.

jalopy

Car.

jammy

Lucky.

jankers

Fatigues. Punishment for apprentices who have committed an RAF offence. Usually allocated in days (7, 14, 28). Can involve detention, but more often just extra duties.

Javelin

RAF (1956 to 1968), UK (Gloucester) twin jet engine (Sapphire 7) fighter aircraft. Distinctive delta wing and high tail-plane. 100th Entry apprentices trained on a Javelin, fitted with an AI17 radar, at Weston Airport Hangar North. Gloster javelin xh903

The Javelin aircraft used at Weston Airport was XA564, redesignated 7464M. An FAW1 variant, first delivered to the RAF on 30/09/1955. It is presently at the RAF Museum, Cosford.

http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/cosford/collections/aircraft/aircraft_histories/84-A-1180%20Javelin%20FAW1%20XA564.pdf

http://rightstuffphotography.com/unitedkingdom/raf/XA564.htm

http://www.abpic.co.uk/photo/1097769/ .

jaw wag

Talk. (See: chin wag).

JL Club

Seedy night club on Wadham street, Weston. Striptease etc. Very racy for 1960s. Off limits to apprentices. Apprentices went there.

Jock

Nickname for person from Scotland;

Pilot, especially of fighter aircraft.

jockey

Pilot, especially of fighter aircraft.

johnny

Contraceptive sheath;

Any protective sheath. (eg: “put the Johnny over the aerial”).

joy ride

Recreational trip on aircraft. stations often maintained a register of airmen requesting a joy ride.

juice

Petrol;

Beer.

jump

Intercourse.

Junior Technician

The normal rank awarded to apprentices after successfully completing the three-year training regime. Exceptional apprentices, including those going on to officer training, were awarded the rank of corporal. Really high-achieving apprentices could even earn the rank of sergeant, but this was rare. The junior technician arm badge was changed from a single inverted chevron to a four bladed propeller in 1964. (See: rank, J/T).

Karls

Hungarian restaurant near the Britannia pub at the north end of the High Street, Weston. Up-market but surprisingly affordable. Flambe dishes were a speciality but beyond the means of apprentices.

KD

Khaki Drill. Buff, lightweight service uniform for hot climates.

keks

Underpants. (See: shreddies).

kerfuffle

Fuss.

Kewstoke

Northern area of Weston on Sand Bay. The Toll Road leads from the Old Pier to Kewstoke.

kip

Sleep.

Kipper Fleet

Coastal Command.

kite

Aircraft.

Kiwi

Person from New Zealand;

The country New Zealand. Alludes to national emblem;

Make of boot polish. Much better than Cherry Blossom for producing a deep bull on boots.

klystron

A microwave linear amplifier used in high-power, high frequency, radar systems. This, together with the magnetron, were a major subject in the apprentice learning schedule. How a klystron works

kosher

Acceptable.

KT66

Classic electronic power valve. (See: valve). KT66

L Fitt AR

Electronics Fitter, Air radar.

L Fitt GR

Electronics Fitter, Ground radar.

L Fitt GW

Electronics Fitter, Ground wireless.

L Tech AD

Electronics Technician, Air Defence

LA

Leading Apprentice. (See: rank, Leading Aircraft Apprentice).

LAA

Leading Aircraft Apprentice. Apprentice NCO, with one chevron. (See: rank).

lab

Laboratory where apprentices carried out practical course work. Radio Lab at Locking

laundry

RAF Locking had a contract with a large laundry in the north of England. The weekly laundry service was free for apprentices but only for RAF items. But there was a charge for civilian clothes. The cleaning process was very powerful and would stress all but the most rugged items. Often apprentices would receive notes in the returned laundry from the laundry girls. Similarly apprentices would send notes to the laundry girls in their laundry.

lay an egg

To lose temper.

leak

Urinate;

Reveal a secret.

leave

Holiday. (See: 48, 36).

Lee

US make of denim jeans and jean jackets. They were of superior cut and made from thick material. In 1962 a pair of Lee jeans cost 30 shillings (£1.50). Illegal for apprentices. (See: Levis).

Lee Enfield

Type of rifle. Each apprentice had a de-activated Lee Enfield rifle for drill. Apprentices and airmen fired once a year at the rifle range. 0.303 inch (7.62 mm) bullet. (See: Bayonet, Bren, Sten). Lee Enfild 303

left hand in pocket

When working on high voltage equipment it is advisable to keep your left hand in your pocket. That way, if you touch a high voltage, the current will bypass your heart and flow down your left arm. Of course, it's all nonsense.

Levis

US make of denim and cord jeans and jean jackets. They were of superior cut and made from thick material. In 1962 a pair of Levi jeans cost 25 shillings (£1.25). Illegal for apprentices. (See: Lee).

Library, Weston

Excellent public library. Situated on the eastern end of the Boulevard where it joins Gerard Road. Old building with high ceilings. The second floor housed Weston Museum. Very stuffy staff in the 1960s. Before Locking camp closed the library was full of books relating to the RAF and electronics. The staff are now very pleasant and helpful, but the RAF related books are much reduced. Still there, essentially unchanged but Weston Museum has moved to a separate building.

lights out

Regulation enforced throughout the RAF. Apprentices had to have the main lights out at 2200 hrs and bedside lights out by 2230hrs. LAs and CAs were allowed an extra 30 minutes, the same time as airmen, but sergeant apprentices and warrant officer apprentices could keep their lights on until 0030 hrs.

line

Aircraft parking and servicing area.

liney

Person who works on the line.

Locking Moor Road

Part of A371 leading from Locking Road, at the Borough Arms, to Locking camp via the hump back bridges. Quite different now.

Locking Road

Part of the A370 from Weston town centre to the junction with Locking Moor Road (A371) at the Borough Arms.

Lofty

Nickname for tall person, often thin too;

Ironic nickname for short person.

Long Bar

Longest bar in west country. Next to Grand Central. Same management as Grand Central and Toby Bar. No longer there.

lounge

Posh part of a pub;

To relax (eg: “lounge about”).

lumpy

Slang for WRAF. Alludes to the shape of WAAFs (ie: lumpy airmen). (See: Women's Royal Air Force).

lush

Short for luscious.

MACD

Maintenance Analysis Computer Department. Was Maintenance Analysis Computer Establishment.

Mae West

Flotation jacket with bulbous buoyant collar. Worn by aircrew and passengers in case of ditching in water. Alludes to plump 1920s movie star.

magazine

rifle attachment containing ammunition;

Periodical. Magazines of the 1960's

magnetron

An electronic device that generates high peak-power microwaves for transmission from radar antennae. The cavity magnetron gave the allies a major advantage in WWII. (See: klystron). Magnetron link

Maintenance Unit

Station or area of station where advanced servicing of an item is carried out. (See: MU).

march

All apprentices were taught to march by drill instructors. Requires coordination of arms and legs so that the left leg and right arm extend forward together. Novices can be spotted when left leg and left arm move forward together.

march, route

Defined march, often across open country, with back packs, etc. Route march

Marshall of the Royal Air Force

God answers to him. (See: rank).

mash

Mashed potato.

Matchless Sports Twin

650cc British motorbike. Solid and torquey. Always painted in Matchless deep red. Characterised by 'jam-pot' rear dampers. AJS produced a similar model which was always in AJS mid blue.

matelot

Royal Navy person.

MCVF

Multi-channel Voice Frequency.

MD

Managing Director;

Medical Doctor.

Meat wagon

Ambulance. Also 'blood wagon'.

medic

Member of the RAF medical corps.

medical

Inspection or examination carried out by the Medical Officer (MO). Involves terms such as 'cough', 'bend over' and 'I wouldn't put my walking stick where you have been putting that'.

Mekon

Large twelve-phase Mercury ark rectifier from the 'Type 80' series of high power ground radars. The name alludes to the monster of science fiction featured in 'The Eagle' comic.

mercury ark rectifier

Electronic power device for converting alternating current into direct current. (See: Mekon).

mess about

Horseplay.

mess up

Make a mistake.

Mini

Morris Mini Minor, same as Austin Mini. Miniature, front-wheel-drive four seater British car launched in 1959. Uncomfortable, unreliable, but cheap and economical. Minis have tenacious road holding and are great fun to drive. The Mini Cooper and Cooper S were enhanced variants, and the Cooper 1275S was a potent machine.

Ministry of defence

UK parliamentary department in overall responsibility for all UK armed forces. Previously called Air Ministry (AM) and, before that, Department of War (DoW).

missus

Wife.

Mk

Mark, usually of aircraft or equipment.

MO

Medical Officer, in charge of sick bay on a station.

mock

Dummy examination;

Laugh at.

mod

Short for modification;

Youth wearing smart clothes and stylish haircut. Often rode a highly adorned motor scooter. Opposite to rocker.

MoD

Ministry of Defence.

MoD PE

Ministry of Defence Procurement Executive. (See: PE).

Monty

Lord Montgomery of Alamein (lead UK forces in the WWII desert campaign);

Howard Montague of RAF Locking;

Nickname for person with surname Montague, Montgomery, etc.

Morris 10

Pre WWII British family saloon car with 1000cc side valve engine. Separate body and chassis. Wire spoke wheels.

Morris 8

Small brother of Morris 10 car.

Morris Minor

British family saloon car. Introduced in 1949. Good handling and economical. British version of 'The people's car'.

Motor Transport

RAF Unit responsible for all aspects of road transport on a station, including vehicles, drivers, and motor mechanics. (See: MT).

movements

Office where postings are organised.

MPN11

GCA ground radar. Essentially same as CPN4.

MRBSSU

Mobile radar Bomb Score Signals Unit.

MT

Motor Transport.

mths

Months.

MU

Maintenance Unit.

muck and bullets

Going on about personal hardship. Dates back to trenches in WW1.

mucker

Friend.

mufti

Civilian blazer and trousers conforming to strict RAF Locking rules. mufti description and photos

N

Many, in the mathematical sense (eg: “he had 'N' books”).

N good

Very good. (See: 'N').

NAAFI

Navy Army & Air Force Institute. Leisure area for apprentices incorporating, cafe, bar, snooker tables, table tennis tables, and TV rooms. NAAFI wagons would deliver snacks and drinks during 'NAAFI break' in the morning and afternoon on week days. The NAFFI girls were pleasant and very popular.

RAF Locking NAAFI

NACOSA

NATO CIS Operating and Support Agency.

naff

Poor quality;

Undesirable.

naff off

Go away.

NAFFI

mis-spelling of NAAFI.

NATO

North Atlantic Treaty Organisation.

NATS

National Air Traffic Services.

NBC

Nuclear, Biological and Chemical.

NBS

Navigation and Bombing System. Airborne radar.

NCO

Non Commissioned Officer. (See: rank).

NCSA

NATO Communications and Information Systems Services Agency.

NDB

Non Directional Beacon.

Newki Amber

Newcastle Amber. Strong light brown ale from the North of England. Really a beer.

Newki Brown

Newcastle Brown. Strong brown ale from the North of England. Really a beer.

Newmarket Bar

Slightly upmarket bar in Bristol. Popular with apprentices.

NHS

National Health Service.

NI

Northern Ireland.

nick

Steal;

Prison.

nicker

Pound note.

Nissen hut

Low building with curved corrugated roof developed by a Canadian engineer in WWI. Nissen hut link

No

Number.

no joy

Did not work;

No cooperation.

Nobby

Nickname for person with surname Clark or Clarke.

nodding horror

Large height finder ground radar. Alludes to the motion of the antenna. (See: FPS6).

nookie

Sex.

Norton 650 SS

650cc British motorbike. Impeccable handling. Based on the Dominator 88 (500cc) and Dominator 99 (600cc).

nose

Front, especially of aircraft.

nosh

Food.

number one

Best uniform. (See: best blue, SD).

number two

Working uniform. (See: working blue, battle dress, BD, beret).

NZ

New Zealand.

OC

Officer Commanding.

OCTU

Operational Conversion and Training Unit.

OCU

Operational Conversion Unit.

oggie

Nickname for person from Cornwall. Alludes to tiddy oggie. Cornwall link

OK

All correct;

All right.

The origin uncertain.

Old Pier

At the Weston end of the Toll Road. Now derelict. (See: Sand Bay).

ole lady

Mother;

Wife.

ole man

Father;

Boss.

ONC

Ordinary National Certificate. (eg: electrical engineering, electronic engineering, electrical and electronic engineering).

one eyed snake

Penis.

one over two pi root L C

After 'ohms law', 'Kirchoff's first law', 'Kirchoff's second law', the fourth formula apprentices learned at technical classes. It calculates the resonant frequency of a tuned circuit and provides the words for a 100th Entry drinking song.

oppo

Friend.

Ops

Operations.

Orange Putter

Aircraft Tail Warning radar.

other denominations

Religions other than Church of England.

over the wall

(See: AWOL).

overrun

(See: overshoot???, crash barrier???).

pad

Accommodation off camp. (See: digs).

Paddy

Nickname for person with first name Patrick;

Nickname for anyone from Ireland.

pan

Tarmac area for parking aircraft, normally for servicing.

pan wash

Large sinks in a mess kitchen for washing pans etc. A task often given to apprentices on jankers;

Sink of greasy water in the mess where apprentices 'washed' their irons and mugs after a meal.

panic

Intense activity (eg: "there is a big panic on, the Queen is visiting the station");

Worry to distraction.

pantomime

Shambles.

PAR

Precision approach radar. A ground equipment.

Para

Member of the distinguished British Army Parachute Regiment.

Parlophone

One of the EMI Ltd group of companies. Music and records. The Beatles joined Parlophone in 1962, leading to many 1960s groups to following suit. (See: HMV, Columbia).

pass out

The formal action of completing a successful RAF apprenticeship. Graduation

Pat

Short for first name Patrick;

Short for pattern.

patch up

Temporary, make-shift, repair.

pay parade

On Thursday mornings apprentices lined up in 3T block to receive their pay packet. In 1965 the pay parade was replaced by direct payment into individual bank accounts.

PDP11

16-bit minicomputer made by The Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC).

PDQ

Pretty Damn Quick.

PDSO

Post Design Services Officer. Runs the contracts and makes sure that the company works to MoD requirements.

PE

Procurement Executive (See: MoD);

Physical exercise.

peach

Very attractive young lady. (eg: "she is a peach").

pecker

Nose;

Penis.

pen pusher

Clerk.

Per Ardua Ad Astra

The RAF motto. No authoritative translation is possible but it is generally taken to mean: 'through adversity to the stars'. Based on Latin.

phonetic alphabet

Internationally recognised set of words to represent the alphabet and numbers from 0 to 9: 'alpha', 'bravo', charlie'...'xray', 'yankee', 'zulu', 'zero'...'niner'. Designed to prevent misunderstanding when using voice communications. FAA Phonetic and Morse Chart

Pill box, the

WWII defensive pill box about 2 miles North of Locking camp on the East of Locking Moor Road (A371), near to Weston Airport. Now painted in black and white checks to attract attention to the helicopter museum.

pinch

'Steal'.

pint

Pint of beer;

UK liquid measure (0.57litre).

pit

Individual bed space.

plastered

Intoxicated.

plod

RAF police;

Military police (MP) (See: snow drop);

Civilian police.

Plough

99th Entry pub on Regent Street in Weston. Demolished in 1972. Now part of Marks and Spencer.

plumber

RAF technician who works on ground radar. Alludes to the similarity between waveguides and water pipes. On the V force, armourers were known as Plumbers

point Percy at the porcelain

Urinate.

poke the fire

Intercourse.

pokey

Prison. (eg:"he is in the pokey").

polish

(See: bull).

pom

Desiccated mashed potato;

British person. Slightly derogatory especially from Australian.

pong

Smell.

ponse

Male poser. (eg:"he is a right ponse").

Pony

Potent, cheap sherry drink in small bottle. Ideal for girlfriend;

£20.

Poodle Pusher

Dog Handler.

poof

Homosexual;

Effeminate male;

Male poser.

portable

In the 60's, anything that would fit in a wheelbarrow.

Portishead

Quiet seaside town on coast, 20 miles north of Weston. Often visited by 100th Entry.

POSB

Post Office Savings Book. In the first year, apprentices had to save a percentage of their pay.

Potty

Pilot Officer Thomas.

PPI

Plan Position Indicator. Display, normally round, showing radar map of earth's surface. PPI link

prang

Crash, normally of aircraft.

pratt

Idiot.

pre-

Before.

prick

Pretentious person;

penis.

Priddy

Village on the Mendip Hills near Wells. The site of 100th Entry exercises. The Queen Victoria was particularly popular after exercises, and to a lesser extent, was the New Inn. Both pubs are still there.

professionals

British Army. Alludes to long running television advertisement.

prop

Short for propeller;

Position of Rugby player.

PT

Physical Training.

PTI

Physical Training Instructor.

pub

Public house;

Publication.

pukka gen

Accurate information. (See: gen).

pull finger out

Do something after procrastinating.

pull his todger

Tease.

purloin

'Steal'.

Purple Harvest

ECM radar fitted to aircraft. Should be Orange Harvest??

PV

Positive vetting. A form of security clearance.

PVR

Premature Voluntary Release.

Q

Qualification. Trade names were amended as technicans obtained additional trade qualifications (eg: L Fitt (AR) Q-RP was an Electronics Fitter (Air radar) who had successfully completed s course on Recce Pods). Other examples: L Fitt GR QCR (Ground radar Fitter CR) , L Fitt GR QNA (Ground radar Fitter Nav) , L Tech AD QSLR (Ground radar Fitter Nav), L Fitt GC QC CY1 CY4 (Ground wireless Fitter C) ????

QA

Quality Assurance.

QRs

Queens Regulations.

quack

RAF doctor, medical officer (see: MO);

Civilian doctor.

Queens

The Queens public house and hotel. The 100th Entry watering hole in Weston. It was on the corner of Regent Street and the High Street, opposite Burtons the tailor. The Queens had a public bar and lounge bar. Behind the public bar was a function room, which was opened for the 100th Entry most evenings. It had a piano and small bar. Upstairs were hotel rooms and additional function rooms. The Queens popularity gradually declined once the 100th Entry left the area, and sadly, the building was demolished. Super Drug is now on the site.

Queens Regulations

The RAF Bible of rules and regulations. (See: QRs).

R Type 80

Ground wireless equipment.

R/T

Radio Transmission;

Radio voice communications.

R1393

Ground wireless equipment.

RA17

Radio receiver. RA17 link

RA17

Ground wireless HF Receiver. Often seen in early James Bond films.

RAAF

Royal Australian Air Force.

RADAR (radar)

Radio Aid to Detection And Ranging. Acronym originated in US. Originally called Radio Direction Finding(RDF)in UK.

radio

The transmission of information by electromagnetic waves;

RAF Trade Group 2, encompassing wireless and radar fitters;

RAF term encompassing wireless and radar.

radome

Weatherproof cover over an antenna (aerial) which is transparent to electromagnetic waves.

RAE

Royal Aircraft Establishment. Located at Farnborough.

RAF

Royal Air Force. The air force branch of the British Armed Forces, formed on 1 April 1918. Letters pronounced individually or as a word.

RAF Brat

Son/daughter of airman.

RAF Locking

Number one Radio School near Weston Super Mare, Somerset. RAF Radio trade Apprentice training, which had started in 1922 at RAF Cranwell, was moved to RAF Locking in 1952. In 1964, the RAF's maintenance policy changed from ‘maintenance by repair’ to ‘maintenance by replacement’. This was reflected, that year, by substituting the three year apprentice scheme with a three year 'Technician Apprentice' scheme and a one year 'Craft Apprentice' scheme. In 1965 all air radio trade training moved to RAF Cosford, leaving only ground radio training at RAF Locking. In 1966 the 106th Entry were the last Aircraft Apprentices to pass out from RAF Locking.

RAF Regiment

(See: Rock Apes).

RAFFTS

RAF Fixed Telecommunications System.

RAFG

Royal Air Force Germany.

raid

To raid junior Entry billets and cause havoc. Highly illegal.

Railway, The

Pub and rooms. Located to the west of the Floral Clock. Small public bar and small lounge. Not often visited by the 100th Entry. It is still there but is called ???

Raglan Arms

Small quiet pub on the south side of Upper Church Road, nearly opposite the Criterion. Visited by the 100th for a short while. Became the 104th Entry pub.

rank

Awful.

rank, RAF airmen and NCO

RAF enlisted ranks

rank, RAF apprentice

Aircraft Apprentice (AA): no chevrons;

Leading Aircraft Apprentice (LAA; LA): one chevron on both upper sleeves of jacket;

Sergeant Aircraft Apprentice (SAA; SA): three chevrons on both upper sleeves;

Warrant officer apprentice (WOA; WA): badge on lower left arm. The WOA rank was only held for the day of the Entry pass out.

rank, RAF officer

RAF officer ranks

rat arsed

Intoxicated.

RC

Roman Catholic.

RCA [UK]Ltd

Radio Corporation of America. An American electronics defence contractor and music recording company.

RDF

Radio Direction Finding.

Ready Steady Go

ITV (Independent Television) live pop music show. Compulsory viewing for apprentices at 1800 hours before hitting the town on Saturday night.

Rebecca Mk8

Airborne Navigation radar. Minor equipment for some apprentice trades.

Red Arrows

RAF aerobatic team formed in 1964. Used Gnat first and changed to Hawk.

Red Barrel

Bitter keg beer made by Watneys. 60s and 70s Beer Guide

Red Steer

Aircraft Tail Warning radar.

red top

British Army military police. Alludes to the colour of the cap;

Air-to-air missile controlled by airborne radar.

reesty

Dirty. Peculiar apprentices term. Possibly derived from a contraction of 'revolting' and 'rusty'. Pronounced as spelt.

REME

Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. Distinguished part of the British Army. Resourceful. Unofficial motto 'can do'. REME often sorted out major structural problems with airfield and installations.

remuster

To change service. ("he remustered from the RAF to the Navy").

REU

Radio Engineering Unit. Located at RAF Henlow.

reunion

Meeting of comrades, normally after a considerable time. The 100th Entry has held three reunions so far.

RFC

Royal Flying Corps. Formed as a branch of the British Army by Lord Trenchard. Forerunner of RAF.

rifle

Ceremonial and combat firearm. (See: Lee Enfield);

Search through.

rifle sling

Webbing strap for rifle. (See: webbing, Lee Enfield, frog, Bayonet).

rigger

Technician who services the aircraft structure or ground aerial installations.

RN

Royal Navy.

roasting

Strong reprimand. (eg: "his wife gave him a good roasting").

Rock Apes

Nickname for RAF Regiment, a specialist corps within the Royal Air Force, responsible for capturing and defending airfields and associated installations. The term came into use after an accident in Aden during 1952 when two Regiment officers decided to amuse themselves by going out to shoot some of the baboons, which are known locally as 'rock apes'. In the semi-darkness one of the officers fired at a moving object in the distance but, on reaching the target, discovered he had shot the other officer. Regiment info

rocker

Person with motor bike, leather jacket and boots, jeans, and teddy boy haircut. rockers and mods were enemies and often clashed.

Roger

'Yes', especially over voice communications.

Rolling Stones

1960s international super group from UK. Specialised in 'rhythm and blues', and rock. Mick Jagger(lead singer), Bryan Jones (deceased) (vocals and guitar), Keith Richards (lead guitar), Charley Watts (drums), Bill Wyman (electric bass).In 1968. the founder, Bryan Jones was to die in mysterious circumstances. Very popular with the 100th Entry. (See: Beatles).

roundel

Round red, white and blue symbol of the RAF, although the white is generally not used on modern combat aircraft.

Royal Hotel

Posh, quiet hotel on Weston sea front. The 'Blue Room' was particularly so. Became The Berni Royal, owned by Berni Inns. It has changed hands about three times.

RRAF

Royal Rhodesian Air Force. Some apprentices were sent to RAF Locking from Rhodesian to train for the RRAF. Typically 2% of an Entry. The 100th Entry had 2 Rhodesian apprentices.

RSF

Radio Servicing Flight.

RTPS

Radio and Technical Publications Section. Located at RAF Henlow.

Rummer

Slightly upmarket bar in Bristol, near Bristol Bridge. Pleasant ambience. Popular with the 100th Entry.

runs

Upset stomach.

SA

Sergeant Apprentice. (See: SAA, rank).

SAA

Sergeant Aircraft Apprentice. (See: SA, rank).

SAC

Senior AirCraftsman. (See: rank).

Sack

Mattress.

SADSU

Strike Command Avionics Development and Servicing Unit, a term from the V Bomber days.

Saint George's

Hamlet just outside Weston on the Bristol road (A370). Now greatly expanded and dominated by the massive, and very busy, roundabout at junction 21 of the M5 motorway.

Salisbury Hotel

Venue for apprentice dances. Close to the Winter Gardens in Weston. It has been demolished and the area is now covered by the 'Sovereign Center' multi-story car park.

Sand Bay

Bay at the northern extent of Weston at Kewstoke. The Toll Road leads from the area of the Old Pier to Sand Bay. The sea-bed at Sand Bay is littered with unexploded munitions from WWII.

Sand Dunes

On the southern extreme of Weston beach near the mouth of the river Axe and Weston Golf Course. An area where many apprentice conquests were consummated. Also scene for beach parties and barbecues, especially at night.

SARBE

Search and Rescue Beacon Equipment. There are SARBE ground stations and small transmitters with a foil antenna that is attached to the aircrew Mae Wests. The small unit transmitted a signal that allowed personnel to be located, especially at sea after ditching from an aircraft. sarbe.com

SATCO

Station Air Traffic Control Officer. In overall charge of all flying operations on a station. His first, second and third priorities are SAFETY. Do not upset the SATCO.

SATCOM

Satellite Communications.

sauce

Alcoholic drink.

saused

Intoxicated.

Scaley

Married airman. Refers to higher rate of pay (Scale "E").

Scope dope

AEOP (nickname for Air Electronics Operators on the Nimrods).

scouser

Nickname for person from Liverpool.

screaming ab dabs

(See: Gandhi's revenge).

screech

Dry, rough farmhouse cider mixed with orange juice. Alludes to effect on digestive system next morning.

scrounge

To obtain something unofficially.

scrubber

Loose female.

scrumpy

West country cider normally brewed in farmhouses. Available in two types, 'rough' and 'sweet'. Potent and cheap. An aquired taste. (See: screech, blood).

SD

Service Dress. Peaked service cap to be worn with best blue uniform. Subject to much modification.

seat of the pants

To complete a task under extremely trying conditions (eg: "the pilot flew the aircraft by the seat of his pants").

send to Coventry

To ignore a person by all others (eg: "he was sent to Coventry").

sergeant

(See: NCO, rank).

sergeant's mess

The name a misnomer. It should be SNCO's mess. Accommodation, restaurant and bar for SNCOs. The sergeants mess annual ball is normally a grand extravaganza.

Shackleton

RAF (1951 to 1990), UK (Avro) four contra-rotating propeller engine (Griffon) maritime reconnaissance aircraft. Based on the Lancaster (Lincoln) with new fuselage. Nickname: The Growler. 100th Entry 'air general' trade apprentices flew on Shackletons at RAF Saint Mawgan. Shackleton mail drop

The Shackleton aircraft used at Weston Airport was VP289, redesignated 7730M. An MR1 variant, it was first flown on 25/06/1951. Issued to 224Sqn on 31/08/1951. Transferred to 269 Sqn at Gibraltar on 07/01/1952, but suffered a Cat 3 flying accident on 22/02/1952, when the main wheels struck the top of the sea wall at the end of North Front's runway. Repairs on site were completed on 11/07/1952, when the aircraft returned to 269 Sqn at Ballykelly. To 206 Sqn on 30/07/1956. Transferred to 269 Sqn on 07/01/1958 and operated from Christmas Island on detachment. Withdrawn from use and flown to Weston for use as a ground instructional airframe on 06/09/1961. Scrapped at Weston in April 1966.

shades

Sunglasses. Avant-garde term in the 1960s but now commonplace.

shag

To tire;

Wear out;

Copulate.

shandy

50:50 mixture of beer and lemonade;

Beer.

SHAPE

Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe. NATO/SHAPE

sherbet

alcoholic drink, normally beer.

shiny

Administrator. Name alludes to the seat of the trousers, made shiny by long hours of sitting.

shite hawk

Bird depicted on RAF uniform shoulder badge. First word pronounced to rhyme with 'kite'.

short

A tot of strong liquor, sometimes drunk with a beer chaser.

short back and sides

No back and sides. Type of haircut much favoured by camp barber. Although fashionable now, very unfashionable in the days of Beatle haircuts. (See: haircut).

shorty

Nickname for short person;

Ironic nickname for tall person.

shrapnel

Pieces of exploding shell;

Term for loose small change.

shreddies

RAF issue aertex underpants. Not designed by Calvin Klein.

shufty

Look. (eg: "let's take a shufty at Weston").

SIB

Special Investigation Branch

sick bay

Station hospital.

SIFF

Selective IFF. Taught at 4T block.

Skip

Nickname;

Miss. (eg: "he will skip lunch to be in Weston early").

skipper

Pilot, especially of transport aircraft.

skive

The avoidance of work.

skive

Avoid work.

slammer

Prison.

slash

Urinate;

To modify an SD cap peak to have a downward slope like service police cap.

slop chit

(See: slop sheet).

slop sheet

Imprecise term for list of tasks to be completed, normally by an individual.

small pack

Small webbing bag with shoulder strap. (See: webbing, bull).

smashed

Clinically intoxicated.

Smelly

Member of WRAF.

Smokey

Nickname, normally for a person with First name 'Joe'.

Smudge

Person with surname 'Smith'. (See: Smudger).

Smudger

Person with surname 'Smith'. (See: Smudge).

SNCO

Senior NCO, often pronounced “sneak owe”.

sneak

Person who tells tales to the authorities;

Unpopular person.

snitch

To tell authorities of some misdemeanour.

snoop

Service police, MP (see: snow drop, plod);

To listen in to a conversation.

snow drop

Service policeman. Alludes to white hat. (See: plod, snoop).

sod

Devilish person;

Undesirable person. Often used jokingly. (eg: "he was a right sod").

sortie

Aircraft flight from take-off to landing.

sparks

Radio trade. Alludes to the insignia on the arm badge. The sparks badge was discontinued in 1964. sparks badge

speak to Hughie on the big white telephone

To be sick in the WC, on your knees. 'Hughie' alludes to the noise.

spew

Be sick.

Spit

Short for Spitfire.

Spitfire

RAF (1938 to 1955), UK (Supermarine [Vickers]), single piston engine (Merlin, later Griffon) fighter aircraft. Along with the Hurricane, enabled RAF pilots to save the country in the Battle of Britain. Nickname: Spit. SpitfireDuxford2JM A Spitfire was the gate guardian at RAF Locking. Gate Guardian

sports afternoon

Thursday afternoons were devoted to sports for apprentices at RAF Locking. The RAF provides excellent sports facilities including: gymnasium, athletics stadium, number of sports fields. Apprentices were supported in the pursuit of a wide range of sports including: swimming at Knightstone Baths, archery, cross country running, football, golf, and rugby.

sports day

Yearly official station sports event.

spot on

Perfect.

spout

Talk a lot, often nonsense.

sprog

Junior apprentice;

Baby.

spud

Potato;

Nickname for person with surname 'Murphy'. Alludes to the historic farming of potatoes in Ireland.

squaddie

Army person.

squadron

Typically three or four flights of aircraft, making a total of 12 to 24 aircraft, depending on aircraft type;

Group of flights of apprentices at Locking. (See: disk, flight).

square bashing

Doing drill normally on parade square.

squawk box

Intercom;

Tannoy.

station

Area under the control of the Ministry of Defence for RAF operations.(See: camp, base).

station standing orders

Similar to by-laws in civvy street.

station warrant officer

The SWO, often pronounced as a word, is the senior Warrant Officer on an RAF station and is responsible for discipline. Comparable to the Regimental Sergeant Major in a British Army unit. The SWO is required to know the RAF Drill and Ceremonial manual (AP818) inside out.

Station, Weston General

The main railway station in Weston off the loop line running through the town. The scene of many meetings and partings for apprentices. Another station, Weston Milton Halt, is near the Borough Arms.

Station, Weston Milton Halt

Small railway station near the Borough Arms in Weston.

Sten

Small submachine gun. Issued to NCOs and SNCOs in times of trouble. Developed in WWII when it cost ten shillings (50 new pence)to manufacture. Notorious for jamming and spraying everything, except target, at rifle range. Sten gun

stick

Short for 'joy stick';

Power. (eg: “give the car more stick”).

Stickies

Cakes and buns. Basic NAAFI fare. (eg: “tea and stickies”).

stitch up

To frame someone.

stripe

Chevron. (See: hook, rank).

stripped

Reduced to a lower rank, following a misdemeanour.

SU

Signals Unit.

survival rations

(See: hard tack).

sweet

Sweet, farmhouse cider. (See: screech, blood);

Good.

swift half

Have a quick beer. (See: half, pint).

swindle

Unofficial fund for providing drinks and snacks. Every section had one. Either coffee swindle or tea swindle.

swipe

'Steal'.

SWO

Station Warrant Officer.

T63

Apprentice's and airmans best uniform. (See: best blue).

Tac

Tactical.

TACAN

Tactical Air Navigation radar. There are air and ground equipments.

TacEval

Tactical Evaluation of war readiness. Also known as an exercise.

Taf

Nickname for someone from Wales. Alludes to the river Taf in Wales.

Taffy

(See: Taf).

tail

Rear end, especially of aircraft;

Attractive young lady.

Tannoy

Public address system. Named after the manufacturer.

tart

Girl. Not a term of derision;

Alluring girl. Not a term of derision;

Loose woman.

Tartan Keg

Bitter, keg beer made by Youngers.

60s and 70s Beer Guide

TASF

Tornado Aircraft Servicing Flight.

TBD

To Be Detailed;

To Be Defined.

TCS

Tornado Components Squadron.

TCW

Tactical Communications Wing.

tea swindle

(See: swindle).

tech

Technician;

Technical block;

Technical class;

Technical person.

techi

Technical person.

technician

RAF airman belonging to one of the technical trades. (eg: radio, engines, armourer, radar, etc).

ted

Short for teddy boy.

teddy boy

 

Youth who wears clothes inspired by the Edwardian period, who likes rock and roll music of the 1950s and 1960s. Sometimes gangs of teddy boys clashed with each other. They had long, greasy hair with a quiff at the front. The sides were combed back to form a duck's arse at the rear. Sideburns were long. They wore knee-length jackets, often with velvet collars and pocket flaps, over high-waisted drainpipe trousers. Chunky brogue shoes were later replaced by large crepe-soled shoes, often suede. These were known as brothel creepers.

Teen and Twenty

Dance at The Winter Gardens, Weston on Thursday night for young people, including apprentices.

Ten Bars, the

Ten bars in a cellar in Bristol. Each bar had an individual theme (eg: Spanish Bar, Italian Bar, Mexican Bar, etc). Also known as Cellar Bars. Popular with apprentices.

tent

RAF blue rain coat. Supported only by periphery of neck. It was possible for wearer to complete a 360 deg turn inside without it moving it. Designed by a committee.

TGIF

Thank God It's Friday, because it's the end of a hard week and the weekend will be free.

three greens

Alludes to three green lights in aircraft cockpit to indicate that all three wheels are fully lowered and locked ready for landing;

All correct. (ie: “The fault has been corrected and the radar is now three greens”).

Three Queens

Public House, comprising lounge and public bar, at the south end of the High Street, Weston. Not far from the Queens so there was sometimes confusion between the two. Often had live music but had a reputation for fights. Now completely changed into one large room with plasma TV and bar food. The name, also has been changed to The Pig and Truffle. Was quite popular with the 100th Entry, but only in groups.

throw a wobbly

Lose temper.

ticklish

Difficult to do (eg: "It was a ticklish take off").

tiddy oggie

Cornish pasty.

Tinea

Foot allergy caused by standing barefoot on polished floor.

tit

Switch;

Button;

Breast, but only one side.

tits out

Excellent. (eg: "he had a tits out car"). Alludes to the third stage of relations with girlfriend.

tits up

Dead. Alludes to the direction of nipples when body is reclined.

Toby Bar

Odd, small, quiet bar on Regent Street, Weston. Close to the sea front. Part of Grand Central.

Toll Road

(See: Sand Bay).

TOPS

Training OPportunities Scheme. Subsidised training courses, set up by the Government, to bring people up to date in their chosen subject and to aid employment prospects.

Top of the Pops

Top twenty radio show hosted by Alan Freeman. Always blasting from multiple transistor radios during tea in the mess around 1700 hours on Sundays.

totty

One or more attractive young ladies.

touch

Borrow money;

Dash of lemonade in beer. (eg: bitter touch, lager touch).

tour

Period of time overseas.

tranny

Portable transistor radio.

transformer

Passive electronic device that uses electro-magnetic induction to alter the voltage of an alternating electrical signal and, or to transfer an alternating electrical signal from one isolated circuit to another. Apprentices made a transformer as part of their final workshop exam to produce a working radio receiver.

transistor

Active electronic device that controls the flow of current through a solid crystal material (semiconductor), normally germanium or silicon. Transistors are used for amplification, switching and signal shaping. In the 1960s, transistors were 'new technology' and were starting to replace valves in RAF equipments. 100th Entry apprentices were taught transistor theory. (See: valve).

trendy

Fashionable term at one time. There was a strange interchange where one person would say "trendy" and the other person would reply "groovy". (See: groovy).

Triumph Bonneville

Potent 650cc British motorcycle. Fast and charismatic. A biker's icon of the late 1950s and 1960s. Highly illegal for apprentices to even look at. (Triumph has no connection with Standard-Triumph, the car manufacture).

Triumph Herald

Stylish small family saloon car with separate chassis and independent suspension all around. Early models had quirky rear suspension. (Manufactured by Standard-Triumph who have no connection with Triumph the motorbike manufacturer).

Triumph Spitfire

Two seater sports car based on the Triumph Herald. Affordable and smart. Dangerous rear suspension later fixed by manufacturer.

Triumph Tiger 100

500cc smaller brother of the Triumph Bonneville. Not so highly tuned though.

trolley, off his

Insane. (eg: "he is off his trolley").

TSR2

Tactical Strike and Reconnaissance. UK bomber aircraft prototype. Cancelled in 1967. Role filled by the US Phantom.

TSU

Tactical Signals Unit (eg: 22TSU).

tube

Television set;

Short for cathode ray tube (CRT);

Underground transport network in London ('the underground' or 'the tube').

twat

Fool;

Vagina.

tyke

Untidy person, normally young.

type

Person. (eg: "he is a good type");

Version of an item (eg: equipment, aircraft).

UAE

United Arab Emirates.

UHF

Ultra High Frequency;

UHF radio. There are air and ground equipments.

UJ Club

Union Jack Club.

UK

United Kingdom.

UKADGE

United Kingdom Ground Defence Environment.

uniform

Apprentices were issued with a 'working' uniform (working blue), a 'best' uniform (best blue), a greatcoat, a light-weight waterproof coat (tent), a pair of boots, and a pair of shoes. (See: hairy blue, SD, beret, boot).

Union Jack Club

A club, comprising hotel rooms, restaurants, games rooms, and bars for service and ex-service personnel. Reasonably priced place to stay in Waterloo, London. link

Unit

An indeterminate term for personnel and location performing a particular function. Units vary in size from small to very large.

An indeterminate term for a part of an equipment. (See: black box).

United Kingdom

Comprising: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales (Note: on the 100th web site 'Ireland' referrers to Northern and Southern Ireland unless otherwise stated).

United Services Club

Club in Weston on the Boulevard for service and ex service personnel. Comprised bar, lounge and function rooms upstairs. Now 'Vamps', lap dancing club. Still worth a visit though.

Uphill

Village ajoining the south west of Weston near the mouth of the river Axe and the sand dunes. 100th Entry carried out initiative exercises near the Uphill Boatyard.

US

United States. Short for United States of America;

UnServiceable.

V bomber

One of Valiant, Vulcan or Victor bomber aircraft. Listed in order of introduction to the RAF.

Valetta

The Vickers Valetta was a British twin-engined military transport of the late 1940s. It was an all-metal mid-wing monoplane with a tailwheel undercarriage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Valetta

The Valetta aircraft used at Weston Airport was WD171, redesignated 7642M. A C1 variant, first delivered to the RAF on 08/02/1951 and delivered for training by Locking apprentices on 24/05/1960, although it was only there for a short while during the 100th Entry training. It went to to Manston Fire School on 24/04/1962, was 'Struck off charge' on 30/12/1964 and scrapped.

valve

Active electronic device that controls the flow of current through a vacuum or gas. The active components of a valve are normally contained in a glass envelope. Valves are used for amplification, switching and signal shaping. In the 1960s, valves were used in most RAF equipments but transistors were starting to replace them. (See: transistor).

Varsity

RAF (1951 to 1976), UK (Vickers) twin piston engine (Hercules) crew training aircraft. Essentially the same as the Valletta, with a nose wheel rather than tail wheel. 100th Entry Apprentices flew flight familiarity sorties from Weston Airport in a Varsity.

Vickers_Varsity

britishaircraft

Two Varsity aircraft were used at Weston Airport. WF408 and WL641 were both T1 variants:

WF408 was first delivered to the RAF on 05/03/1952 and was redesignated to 8395M before use at Weston. After time at the RAF Cosford Museum, Northolt dump and GI Sabrewatch, East Grinstead, it was scrapped in July 2007, although it can presently be seen at Bruntingthorpe, Leicestershire

WL641 was first delivered to the RAF on 06/07/1953. After service with Locking apprentices, it spent some time at No.2 School of Technical Training, Cosford, then to Scampton for use in ground instruction before being scrapped.

Velocette Venom

Single cylinder 500cc British motorbike. Very well built and good handling. Characteristic 'fish-tail' silencer.

Velocette Viper

350cc version of the Velocette Venom motorbike.

Venom

The de Havilland Venom was a British postwar single-engined jet aircraft developed from the de Havilland Vampire. It served with the Royal Air Force as a single-seat fighter-bomber and two-seat night fighter. A navalised version, the Sea Venom, served with the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Venom

The Venom aircraft used at Weston Airport was WP227, redesignated 7098M. An NF2 prototype which first flew on the 22/08/1950. It was 'Struck off charge' on 14/12/1956 and delivered for training by Locking apprentices. No details of its whereabouts today, so assumed scrapped.

VHF

Very High Frequency;

VHF radio. There are air and ground equipments.

Victor

RAF (1958 to 1993), UK (Handley Page) four jet engine (Mk2 = Conway, Mk1 = Sapphire) bomber aircraft. Fast and elegant. (See: V bomber, Vulcan). 100th Entry apprentices trained on a Victor at Weston Airport Hangar North.

Victor_V_Bomber

The Victor aircraft used at Weston Airport was XA919, redesignated 7724M. A B1 variant, first delivered to the RAF on 19/09/1957. It was flown in to Weston on 15/05/1961 and was scrapped in July 1970.

Victoria

Pub with rooms. Located to the south of the floral clock. Sold excellent chicken and mushroom pies and other food which could be eaten in their cafe or bought from a counter to take away. In the late 1960s the Vicoria was completely remodelled and became a classy pub and hotel. The original Victoria was rarely visited by apprentices but the food was a special treat. Around 1980 the whole row of buildings was redeveloped and the Victoria is no more.

Vincent Black Shadow

Muscular 1,000cc 'V' twin British motorcycle. A classic.

VIP

Very Important Person.

VOR

VHF Omni-directional Radio Range. A radio navigation system comprising airborne and ground equipments. The VOR ground equipment broadcast a composite VHF radio signal carrying the station's morse code identifier, sometimes a voice identifier, and data that allows the airborne receiving equipment to derive the bearing of the aircraft in relation to the ground equipment.

vote for Joe

Examination paper with multiple answers, normally four, to chose from.

Vulcan

RAF (1956 to 1984), UK (Avro) four jet engine (Olympus), delta wing, bomber. Awesome, powerful and noisy. Impressive at air displays. Nickname: The Tin Triangle. (See: V bomber, Victor, Green Satin). Vulcan at Filton

W/O

Warrant Officer. Often pronounced like command to stop horse. (See: rank; SWO).

WAAF

Woman's Auxiliary Air Force. Later became Women's Royal Air Force (WRAF).

wad

Much money, especially banknotes;

Sandwich.

waf

WAAF or WRAF.

waffle

Circumlocution.

Warrant Officer

(See: rank, W/O, SWO).

waveguide

Metal trunking used in place of cable to carry very high frequency electromagnetic signals, often high power.

webbing

Thick canvas. (See: webbing belt).

webbing belt

Thick canvas belt. The RAF covered it in grey-blue Blanco. White Blanco was applied for special parades. It had a brass buckle with brass clips and was an effective weapon. Apprentices were ordered not to take them off camp.

Webbington Country Club

In the 1960s a classy country club at Loxton, 5 miles West of Locking camp on the back road from Knightstone Garage in Banwell. It had a casino, restaurants, large dance floor and stage. Owned by Alan Wells who had a liaison with Jayne Mansfield. Famous artists often appeared there. A bit expensive for apprentices. But the 100th Entry visited occasionally. Now, the Webbington is an odd combination of gymnasium, conference centre, hotel, and restaurant.

wedge

Sandwich.

Weston

Short for Weston Super Mare, the term always used by locals for the town.

Weston Airport

 

Airport and facilities located about 2 miles north of Locking camp to the west of Locking Moor Road (A371). The airport comprised: single runway, control tower, classrooms, Weston Airport Hangar North and South, Westland helicopter ground test rig, aircraft refurbishment hangars, gliding club, joy flights, and unused RAF buildings, including a small mess. The runway is still there as is Weston Airport Hangar North and South, but nearly all Weston Airport buildings have been levelled. A helicopter museum has opened on the south east corner of the airport.

Weston Airport, Hangar North

Hangar on the North side of Weston Airport near the railway track. Divided by a 7 feet high brick wall. The west part was used by EMI Electronics for research. The east section housed Victor, Shackleton and Javelin aircraft which were used for training air radar apprentices. Outside, Hunter, Canberra and Venom aircraft were also used for training. Close to the hangar, an aircraft dispersal pan accomodated a Varsity which was used for apprentice air experience flights. There was also a classroom and equipment laboratory. Weston hangar North was west of Locking Moor Road (A371), near the hump back bridges, about 2 miles North of Locking camp. Thales now own Weston hangar North which is ringed by a security fence.

See http://www.100th-entry-locking.org.uk/100_Gmaps.html (select 'RAF Locking' from the menu above the map)

Weston Airport, Hangar South

Content to be defined.

Weston Super Mare

Seaside town, 20 miles (32 km) south east of Bristol in the UK. Population: 1960= 55,000, 2007= 90,000. 'Western' is derived from the Saxon words 'West' and 'tun' meaning 'West settlement'. 'Super Mare' is derived from Latin meaning 'On Sea'. In the days of the 100th Entry it was a quiet little town. It has been greatly developed over the years and is now a bustling town, popular with shoppers but often choked with traffic. Unfortunately, much of the quiet charm of the town has been lost. Weston is 5 miles (8km) north of the RAF Locking site on the A371.

Weston Super Mud

Whimsical name for Weston Super Mare. Alludes to sediment deposited on sea bed from the river Severn. The sea goes out a long way at low tide and exposes the mud.

whisky mac

Potent short drink comprising whisky and ginger ale (typically 'Stones'). Strangely, it was popular with apprentices.

Whitbread

Name of brewer;

Short for Whitbread Tankard.

Whitbread Tankard

Bitter, keg beer.

60s and 70s Beer Guide

wiggly amps

Alternating current. (See: A/C).

wind up

To annoy deliberately.

window

Strips of aluminium foil dropped by aircraft to confuse enemy radar. (See: ECM).

wing and a prayer

To attempt a task under difficult conditions. (eg: "the aircraft was riddled with bullets, but the pilot brought it home with a wing and a prayer").

wing it

To attempt a task with insufficient resources or preparation.

Winkle picker

Pointed toe shoe. Illegal for apprentices. (See: chisel).

Winscombe

Winscombe is about 6 miles south of RAF Locking site on the A371 through Banwell.

Winter Gardens

North Somerset District Council owned dance hall on Weston sea front. Many famous entertainers appeared. 1960's

WIP

Work In Progress.

wireless

Wireless refers to the communication of information, often over long distances, by electromagnetic radiation.

with it

Fashionable;

Aware.

wmv

Windows Media Video. A Microsoft Windows file type.

WO Man

Warrant Officer. 'WO' always pronounced like command to stop horse.

womble

(See: dork).

Women's Royal Air Force

Still referred to as WAAFs. Very few WRAFs at RAF Locking. WRAFs were the source of much fantasy for apprentices. (See: WAAF, lumpy).

working blue

working uniform. (See: number two).

working parade

After breakfast and after lunch, apprentices were lined up in front of their block and inspected before being marched to the technical blocks.

Worle

East area of Weston. Was like a small village in the 1960s but now surrounded by a huge housing development extending to Saint Georges.

Worlebury

North east area of Weston, at the eastern extremity of Weston Woods. Location of Worlebury Golf Course.

WOTSAC

When Old Time Spares Are Consumed. Term used in aircraft and equipment modifications.

WRAF

Women's Royal Air Force. WRAF Girls at Locking were locally recuited. They wore the uniform but went home after duty.

written off

Damaged beyond repair.

WSM

Abbreviation for Weston Super Mare.

Wun Wah

Until 1993 the Chinese restaurant in Weston. Now a shadow of its former self. 'The Sea Palace' is now considered to be the best.

WW I

World War One (1914 to 1918).

WW II

World War Two (1939 to 1945).

yob

Uncouth, civilian, youth.

yonks

Long time. (eg: "I haven't seen him for yonks").

yrs

Years.

zip

Computer file type using the zip algorithm to compress data.

zob

(See: zobbit).

zobbit

Officer, especially a pilot.